Covide

UX design utility for experiencing color blindness

Identify Color Blindness

Ishihara Test

The Ishihara test is a color perception test for red-green color deficiencies, the first in a class of successful color vision tests called pseudo-isochromatic plates ("PIP"). It was named after its designer, Dr. Shinobu Ishihara, a professor at the University of Tokyo, who first published his tests in 1917.

The test consists of a number of colored plates, called Ishihara plates, each of which contains a circle of dots appearing randomized in color and size.[2] Within the pattern are dots which form a number or shape clearly visible to those with normal color vision, and invisible, or difficult to see, to those with a red-green color vision defect. Other plates are intentionally designed to reveal numbers only to those with a red/green color vision deficiency, and be invisible to those with normal red/green color vision. The full test consists of 38 plates, but the existence of a severe deficiency is usually apparent after only a few plates. There is also an Ishihara test consisting 10, 14 or 24 test plates.

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Color Vision Deficiency Types

Achromatopsia

The retina contains no cone cells, so that in addition to the absence of color discrimination, vision in lights of normal intensity is difficult.

Achromatomaly

Having both rods and cones, but only a single kind of cone. A cone monochromat can have good pattern vision at normal daylight levels, but will not be able to distinguish hues.

Deuteranopia

Lacking the green cones for medium-wavelength cones, those affected are again unable to distinguish between colors in the green–yellow–red section of the spectrum.

Deuteranomaly

Having a mutated form of the medium-wavelength (green) pigment. The medium-wavelength pigment is shifted towards the red end of the spectrum resulting in a reduction in sensitivity to the green area of the spectrum.

Protanopia

Lacking the red cones for long-wavelength sensitive retinal cones, those with this condition are unable to distinguish between colors in the green–yellow–red section of the spectrum.

Protanomaly

Having a mutated form of the long-wavelength (red) pigment, whose peak sensitivity is at a shorter wavelength than in the normal retina, protanomalous individuals are less sensitive to red light than normal.

Tritanopia

Lacking the short-wavelength cones, those affected see short-wavelength colors (blue, indigo and a spectral violet) greenish and drastically dimmed, some of these colors even as black. Yellow is indistinguishable from pink, and purple colors are perceived as various shades of red.

Tritanomaly

Having a mutated form of the short-wavelength (blue) pigment. The short-wavelength pigment is shifted towards the green area of the spectrum.

Features

Live Color

Expereince color blindness live filtered through your iPhone or iPad display

Infinite

Infinite scrolling gesture user interface simulatensouly provides precision, rapid selection, and rapid reset

Pulse

Contextual audio, haptic, and visual feedback breathes life into the interaction experience.

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Architecture

Software Design